The ten most iconic Premier League away kits - including Arsenal, Leeds, Newcastle and Chelsea classics

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There have been all manner of weird and wonderful away kits during the Premier League era - and here are ten of the most memorable.

It seems beyond belief that the Premier League has celebrated its 30th anniversary during the coming season.

From those early days of Manchester United ending their long wait for another top flight title and Sky Sports introducing Monday Night Football, English football’s top tier has changed beyond recognition.

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Football has become big business and a major part of that is the sale of replica shirts. Supporters from clubs around the league have been subjected to some ‘interesting’ away kits over the years and 3AddedMinutes has decided to pick out what we consider to be ten of the best.

Arsenal (1992/93)

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Our first selection heads all the way back to the very first Premier League season when the Sky Strikers cheerleaders were still dancing on the pitch during the pre-match preparations and satellite dishes were of the size that would attract incoming aeroplanes at Heathrow.

Arsenal ended the Division One era and made their way into the Premier League wearing this beauty. There have been recent efforts to replicate it, but nothing has ever matched the original.

West Ham United (2002/03)

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Okay, so firstly we should apologise to West Ham supporters because this one brings back some pretty painful memories. One of the most talented squads to ever be relegated from the Premier League contained the likes of Jermain Defoe, Michael Carrick, Joe Cole and, of course Paolo di Canio.

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The Hammers suffered a heartbreaking relegation on the final day of a difficult campaign - but despite bringing back those memories, it still remains one of the most eye-catching away kits in the league’s history.

Manchester City (2011/12)

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This won’t be the final kit to be a nod to the past on this list! City were getting into their stride as they aimed to became the leading force in English football and their efforts had been aided by a significant investment from their Abu-Dhabi based owners.

The likes of Sergio Aguero, Edin Dzeko and Mario Balotelli had been attracted to the club and they wore this nod to a 1960s away kit on their way to their first Premier League title.

Tottenham Hotspur (1992-94)

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Worn by one of the most attack-minded sides in Premier League history, this Spurs away kit just evokes memories of the flair provided by the likes of Jurgen Klinsmann, Teddy Sheringham, Nicky Barmby and Gheorghe Popescu. They didn’t win anything but they were fun to watch - which brings us on to...

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Newcastle United (1995/96)

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Possibly the most talented team never to win a Premier League title! The Newcastle United vintage of 1995/96 contained the power of Les Ferdinand, the genial David Ginola and the drive of Robert Lee in midfield - but they came up just short in an iconic title race with Sir Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United.

This kit is another that provided a nod to the club’s past and has also been replicated in recent years. However, nothing came close to seeing Kevin Keegan’s Entertainers wearing it in their pomp.

Manchester United (1992-94)

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The lace-up collar, the half and half design, and seeing Eric Cantona strut his stuff with all of the arrogance in the world. This was a genuine classic that became one of the hallmarks of the first two years of the Premier League era as the Red Devils claimed a first top tier title since the days of Sir Matt Busby before going on to retain it 12 months later.

Chelsea (2003/04)

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The away kit that opened up the Roman Abramovich era at Stamford Bridge and provided Claudio Ranieri with what felt like a rather cruel departure after he led Chelsea to a second placed finish and to the semi-finals of the Champions League. This brings back memories of Frank Lampard’s development into a top-class midfielder going up a gear and world stars like Claude Makelele and Hernan Crespo arriving in the Premier League.

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Leeds United (2020/21)

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After an absence of 16 years, Leeds United arrived back in the Premier League and they brought Marcelo Bielsa with them. Playing an energetic brand of football, the Whites were in fine form and secured a credible ninth-place finish as the likes of Patrick Bamford, Kalvin Phillips and Raphinha all made their mark in the top tier. Their home kit was a neat effort - but this away kit was sublime.

Liverpool (1995/96)

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The mid-90s was more than likely a strange time to be a Liverpool fan. With memories of the all-conquering sides of the 1970s and 1980s still fresh in the mind, there seemed enough talent in the squad to secure further major honours on a consistent basis. The likes of Robbie Fowler, Jamie Redknapp and Steve McManaman all impressed but a Coca Cola Cup Final win over Bolton Wanderers in 1995 provided their only major honour at the time. The following season would sum it up.

A third place finish in the Premier League without really being a challenger, early exits from the UEFA Cup and League Cup and beaten in the FA Cup Final by rivals Manchester United - with the latter occurring whilst wearing this lovely Adidas effort.

Everton (1994/95)

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A historic season for the Toffees - albeit one that saw them fighting for survival in the bottom half of the Premier League season after a difficult year under Joe Royle. Success would arrive in the grand manner as the likes of Paul Rideout, Andy Hinchcliffe and Daniel Amokachi helped their side lift the FA Cup with a 1-0 final win over Manchester United. This away kit was something a little bit different and it was used during the following season with a different sponsor.

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